********** please respond to the discussion below with a paragraph add citation and references 🙂 ******We know the factors that can help care services provide end of life care shaped around the needs and wishes of the individual and their family and careers. A health or social care professional needs to take responsibility for initiating discussion with the individual and their family about end of life care, conduct a comprehensive assessment and start the process of advance care planning. Services need to talk to each other and ensure that the results are shared (in accordance with confidentiality rules) with appropriate partners. Hospitals should be committed to rapid discharge of an individual home to die – and plan with their community partners what services, equipment and medication the person will need at home. Similarly, good planning and information sharing will reduce the high number of unplanned admissions to hospital when a person’s condition deteriorates as death approaches.Decision-making for the end of a patient’s life should occur over years rather than just in the minutes or days before a patient’s death. Nurses can be a resource and support for patients and families at the end of a patient’s life and in the decision-making process that precedes it. Nurses are often ideally positioned to contribute to conversations about end-of-life care and decisions, including maintaining a focus on patients’ preferences, and to establish mechanisms to respect the patient’s autonomy. There are times when the preferences of the family do not represent, or are in conflict with, the preferences of the patient. In those cases, the nurse’s primary responsibility is to provide care and support to the patient and to respect the patient’s autonomy while continuing to support the family as they struggle to adjust to the impending reality of the patient’s death. Standards for excellent care for patients at the end of life should be evidence based, and should integrate national and international standards of care. Henry, C. (2010, August 11). Too many people are dying in hospital against their wishes. Retrieved from https://www.theguardian.com/society/joepublic/2010/aug/11/dying-end-of-life-choices-home-hospitalANA Enterprise | American Nurses Association. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.nursingworld.org/